Advertisement

SilverSky LifeSciences DxPx Conference 2019 Düsseldorf Medica 600x60px
Document › Details

Adaptimmune Ltd.. (12/10/13). "Press Release: Adaptimmune Announces Interim Results from a Phase I/II Trial of Engineered T Cells Targeting Cancer Testis Antigens in Multiple Myeloma". Oxford & Philadelphia, PA.

Region Region United States (USA)
Organisations Organisation Adaptimmune Ltd.
  Group Adaptimmune (Group)
  Organisation 2 American Society of Hematology (ASH)
Products Product T cell therapy
  Product 2 clinical research
Person Person Noble, James (Adaptimmune CEO before MediGene 200609–200809 before Avidex)
     


Study continues to report encouraging response rates, safety and proof of mechanism


Adaptimmune today announces the release of interim results from a Phase I/II clinical trial using patients' own T cells that have been genetically altered to attack multiple myeloma (MM) cells. The study Chair presented these updated results today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).

The clinical trial was designed as a single arm open label study where patients are given standard of care (autologous stem cell transplant). This is followed by infusion of a patient's own T cells that have been genetically engineered to carry receptors that help the T cells recognize and attack tumors, while sparing healthy tissue.

The objectives for the study are to evaluate the safety, bioactivity and anti-tumor effect of infusion of patients' own T cells that have been genetically modified to express a high affinity T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a type of tumor antigen (protein) known as a cancer testis antigen (CT antigen). The target CT antigens in the study are NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1. Anti-tumor responses are reported as best response by day 100 following the transplant and T cell infusion.

The initial six patient phase was completed in 2012 and based on encouraging preliminary results announced at ASH last December, the study was extended to a target enrollment of 26 patients. To date, 21 patients have been enrolled. 20 patients have received engineered T cells and have been assessed at day 100 for tumor responses to the treatment. 19 patients have reached a minimum of six month follow-up and 15 patients have reached one year follow-up.

After one year, patients are followed for disease status quarterly, and progression free and overall survival will be collected as the study follow-up matures. Patients are also monitored no less than bi-annually for safety and correlatives specific to the engineered T cells.

Multiple myeloma is a hematologic cancer localized to the bone marrow and is currently incurable in most patients. With standard therapy, long-term response rates are low and the median survival for patients with this disease is three to five years.

The clinical study focuses on this unmet medical need and includes patients who have received prior treatment for their myeloma or who have disease considered to be high risk, who are eligible for an autologous stem cell transplant (auto-SCT), and whose tumor expresses NY-ESO and/or LAGE-1. Auto-SCT is the transplant of a patient's own stem cells, which is a standard of care for treatment of multiple myeloma in the U.S. Infusion of the gene modified T cells occurs two days following auto SCT.

Dr. Aaron Rapoport, the Chair of the clinical study, presented abstract 766 entitled "Engineered T-Cells Expressing An HLA-Restricted Affinity-Enhanced TCR in Advanced Multiple Myeloma Patients Post Auto-SCT Engraft and Are Associated with Encouraging Post Auto-SCT Responses".

He reports that infusions of engineered T cells have been well tolerated. The overall best response rate at 100 days is 77%. This rate is encouraging in these patients, of whom approximately 50% have high risk disease, 25% have received prior transplant, and NY-ESO expression is associated with poor prognosis.

Of the 20 patients treated to date, 13 have ongoing responses, and seven have progressed. In cases of disease progression, a concomitant loss or reduction of engineered T cells, or a loss of antigen positivity on recurring tumor has been observed. Consequently, the protocol has been modified to allow for additional infusions without concomitant transplant, provided the patient's tumor continues to express target antigen.

"The clinical responses seen in our patients are encouraging and are generally better than I expected from transplant alone," says Dr. Rapoport, the Gary Jobson Professor in Medical Oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Associate Director of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center. "I look forward to making this technology available to patients outside of the transplant setting."

Enrollment is nearly completed and a final study analysis in planned to start in late 2014. Interim safety and response data presented at the ASH conference is under preparation for publication in the first half of next year.

"This study has provided us with important insights into the activity of NY-ESO T cells," said Mr. James Noble, Chief Executive Officer of Adaptimmune. "It has been a privilege to work with this translational team and we are encouraged by progress to date on this study and our studies in solid tumor indications."

Additional study details and contact information for patients interested in finding out more about participation can be found at clincialtrials.gov, under trial identifier number NCT01352286.

The study was originally developed by Dr. Carl H. June at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) Abramson Cancer Center and Dr. Rapoport. Dr. Rapoport is the lead clinical investigator at the University of Maryland and protocol Chair. Dr. Edward Stadtmauer is the lead clinical investigator at the UPenn Abramson Cancer Center, and Dr. Dan Vogl is a sub-investigator at UPenn. Dr. Michael Kalos led correlative studies at UPenn during his tenure as Director of the Translational and Correlative Sciences Laboratory (TCSL) at UPenn (now at Eli Lilly), and Dr. Simon Lacy is completing these studies at the TCSL on his behalf. Initially, Dr. June served as the regulatory sponsor (FDA representative) for the study and T cell manufacturing was performed at the Clinical Cell and Vaccine Production Facility at the University of Pennsylvania directed by Dr. Bruce Levine. In April 2013, following the Novartis engagement of UPenn for CD19 engineered T cell therapy in CLL and ALL, Adaptimmune assumed the sponsorship and T cell manufacturing roles for this study. Adaptimmune is also the financial sponsor for the study and owns the T cell receptor technology.

Adaptimmune has also opened a new 10 patient pilot study, designed to evaluate the safety and anti-tumor effects of the engineered T cells without transplant. This trial is now enrolling at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, Maryland, and the City of Hope in Duarte, California.

Additional study details and contact information for patients interested in finding out more about participation can be found at clincialtrials.gov, under trial identifier number NCT01892293.

Other trials in ovarian cancer, melanoma and synovial sarcoma are ongoing in the U.S. and can be found on clincialtrials.gov.

Ends

Contact
Margaret Henry
PR Consultant
Adaptimmune Ltd, UK
T: +44 (0)1865 261491
Mob: +44 (0)7771 377363
E: m.henry@oxin.co.uk

Images:
T cell (blue) killing a tumor cell (red)
Adaptimmune laboratory - Scientists growing research cells
Adaptimmune laboratory - Scientist growing a cell therapy product


Notes for editors


About Adaptimmune

Adaptimmune is focused on the use of T cell therapy with engineered T cell receptors to treat cancer and infectious disease. Established in July 2008 with a research base in Oxford, UK and a clinical base in Philadelphia, US, it aims to utilise the body's own machinery - the T cell - to target and destroy cancerous or infected cells by using engineered, increased affinity T cell receptor (TCRs) as a means of strengthening natural patient T cell responses. Adaptimmune undertakes all of its own research and development using proprietary T cell receptor engineering technology co-developed and co-owned with its sister company Immunocore Ltd (formerly Avidex/MediGene) but exclusively licensed for T cell therapy to Adaptimmune. Backed by private investors, Adaptimmune is now in the clinic in the US, in HIV as well as multiple cancer indications with its engineered TCR to the NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 cancer testis antigen.


About Adaptimmune's T cell therapy

Cancerous or virally infected cells will typically present small parts or peptides of larger viral proteins or abnormal cancer proteins on their surface, offering a "molecular fingerprint", called an epitope, for killer T-cells from the immune system to identify. In a healthy individual, this triggers an immune response, eliminating the affected cell.

However, viruses such as HIV mutate rapidly, swiftly disguising their fingerprints to allow them to hide from killer T-cells while cancer proteins are usually derived from self-proteins against which natural TCRs do not respond.

Adaptimmune's technology uniquely enhances the natural TCR affinity to either viral or cancer protein epitopes on an individual patient's cells overcoming these obstacles for therapeutic benefit.

Adaptimmune has undertaken significant preclinical development with a number of pipeline TCRs to demonstrate their potency and specificity in vitro. The TCR in the current myeloma study specifically recognizes two cancer testis antigen targets: NY-ESO-1 157-165 and LAGE-1 (HLA A2; SLLMWITQC), and was engineered using Adaptimmune's proprietary TCR engineering platform.

http://www.adaptimmune.com

   
Record changed: 2019-04-21

Advertisement

Picture [LSUS] Life-Sciences-USA.com – The Business Web Portal 600x60px

More documents for Adaptimmune (Group)


To subscribe to our free, monthly newsletter for the European life sciences, please send an e-mail to info@iito.de and simply fill the subject line with the word »LSE Newsletter«

To get even more information, please take a look at our [gs] professional services offering and read the gene-sensor Product Flyer [PDF file]

Advertisement

Picture [LSG] Life-Sciences-Germany.com – The Business Web Portal 600x80px




» top